jottings

art babble

... not actually published, unfortunately
25/10/2020
May I submit an entry for the Incomprehensibility Prize please? It relates to visual art rather than literature but I don’t think that should disqualify it. (If it was about poetry I would submit it for the Poetry Babble award too: perhaps we can have something like a Pretentious Twaddle prize instead?)

“Using physical and digital media in isolation, in combination and iteratively, I produce sets and series of images to explore real and perceptual change. We are physically and conceptually defined by the tools we use and understand. We anchor ourselves to the spotlights of our competencies, nodes in networks of change surrounded by shadow. I represent perceptual change by exploiting different tools; applying physical and digital media creates many perspectives but simultaneously hints at a singularity. A piece of work hides as much as it reveals. Obliteration is inherent to the act of recording …

Obliterated Crow presents a series of visual conversations between a crow, the air and the media used. My conversation began with the crow on Galley Hill. She tilted her head and made eye contact; I drew her. “Think that’s interesting?” she asked, as she skipped into the air and played with the wind.”

The first sentence of this blurb, which I deliberately left until now, reads “Having both a degree in Fine Art and a Masters in IT, I experience the tension and synchronicity of these divergent disciplines.” If I had read only the main body of text, above, I could have guaranteed that he (and any artist who writes like this) had a (relatively recent) degree in Fine Art.

To get into St Martins in the early 1960s I had to show that I could draw and paint, and prove that I could read and understand English: that was it. Full stop.

And the artwork the man is talking about?trivial, decorative, shallow, … in short, crap! (just look for cliff crawford, artist)

I’ve always tended to feel the same way as Georgia O’Keefe: "I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say any other way - things I had no words for."